31 Days, 31 Villains: #3, Aaron

Villain #3 finishes off Titus Andronicus, with the chaotic, cynical, destructive Moor. If one good deed in all his life he did, he repents it – that warrants a Top Three spot, I’ll say!

The Villains so far:
#31 – Iachimo, Cymbeline
#30 – Saturninus, Titus Andronicus
#29 – Cloten, Cymbeline
#28, #27 – Chiron and Demetrius, Titus Andronicus
#26 – Caliban, The Tempest
#25 – Shylock, Merchant of Venice
#24 – Cassius, Julius Caesar
#23 – Proteus, Two Gentlemen of Verona
#22 – Duke Frederick, As You Like It
#21 – Don John, Much Ado About Nothing
#20 – Duke of Buckingham, Richard III
#19 – Antonio, The Tempest
#18 – Dionyza, Pericles
#17 – The Queen, Cymbeline
#16 – Leontes, A Winter’s Tale
#15 – Antiochus, Pericles
#14 – Duke of Cornwall, King Lear
#13 – Oliver, As You Like It
#12 – Queen Margaret, Henry VI and Richard III
#11, #10 – Goneril and Regan, King Lear
#9 – Claudius, Hamlet
#8, #7 – The Macbeths, Macbeth
#6 – Angelo, Measure for Measure
#5 – Tamora, Titus Andronicus
#4 – Edmund, King Lear

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31 Days, 31 Villains: #5, Tamora

We finally revisit Titus Andronicus and bring you the mother of villains 26 and 27. They had to get it somewhere – here’s where. Welcome to the Top Five!

The Villains so far:
#31 – Iachimo, Cymbeline
#30 – Saturninus, Titus Andronicus
#29 – Cloten, Cymbeline
#28, #27 – Chiron and Demetrius, Titus Andronicus
#26 – Caliban, The Tempest
#25 – Shylock, Merchant of Venice
#24 – Cassius, Julius Caesar
#23 – Proteus, Two Gentlemen of Verona
#22 – Duke Frederick, As You Like It
#21 – Don John, Much Ado About Nothing
#20 – Duke of Buckingham, Richard III
#19 – Antonio, The Tempest
#18 – Dionyza, Pericles
#17 – The Queen, Cymbeline
#16 – Leontes, A Winter’s Tale
#15 – Antiochus, Pericles
#14 – Duke of Cornwall, King Lear
#13 – Oliver, As You Like It
#12 – Queen Margaret, Henry VI and Richard III
#11, #10 – Goneril and Regan, King Lear
#9 – Claudius, Hamlet
#8, #7 – The Macbeths, Macbeth
#6 – Angelo, Measure for Measure

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31 Days, 31 Villains: #28-#27, Chiron and Demetrius

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Today, in a 2-for-1 Villain entry of #28 and #27, we have the devilish duo of Chiron and Demetrius, sons of the Goth Queen and Roman Empress Tamora. They commit acts of horror – so why aren’t they higher on the list? Listen in to find out what they do, what they don’t do, and what knocked them out of the top ten.

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31 Days, 31 Villains: #30, Saturninus

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Villain #30 on the list is Titus Andronicus’ Saturninus – he doesn’t have an evil plot of his own, but he manages some pretty awful stuff nonetheless.

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PS. Not listed in the video is the awesomely lovely episode where Saturninus petulantly tries to steal his brother’s fiancee because, hey, I’m the emperor now and your would-be father-in-law is a slave of duty so HA!

Shakespeare’s Best Brothers

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I had Mother’s Day to talk about Moms and Father’s Day to talk about Dads. But what about the most contentious familial relation found in Shakespeare – Are there any good brothers out there? I’ve found five, and here they are! And, just because there’s such rich variety to choose from on the other side of things, look out for Monday’s episode, where I will be counting down Shakespeare’s top five WORST brothers. Lots of competition, see if you can guess who will be on there!

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Shakespeare’s Themes: End of a Tragedy

While Shakespeare tragedies often kill off many of the relevant characters, those left behind to lead the way into the future are interesting too. Here is a discussion of three characters who are raised to power by the end of their respective tragedies: Lucius (Titus Andronicus), Malcolm (Macbeth), and Fortinbras (Hamlet).

And, with a much pithier statement on the end of tragedies than I could ever muster, here is TheGeekyBlonde’s Hamlet, which ends with her Fortinbras summing up how Shakespeare ends his tragedies. http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=1mHQ8te8Rfk