Shakespeare Themes: The Myth of Phaeton

[blip.tv http://blip.tv/play/AYOChmoA?p=1 width=”450″ height=”300″]

Shakespeare uses Greek mythology in his plays often, and the references he uses serve to illuminate the overarching themes of the moment – today, I present the myth of the demigod Phaeton, and how it’s used in four different Shakespeare plays.
Follow along with me on:
and
For more Shakespearean fun!
A snapshot of the myth of Phaeton: Myth of Phaeton
Advertisements

Shakespeare Themes: Mercutio, Tybalt, and Verona

In “Romeo and Juliet,” there’s a climactic fight scene between Mercutio and Tybalt, two men who… had no interaction before that moment? Why exactly are they on such a collision course then? I investigate why in the latest installment of “Shakespeare Themes”.

Follow me on Facebook, on Twitter at @Cassius614, and on Tumblr for more Shakespeare fun!

Shakespeare’s Themes: The Three Kings

Not a religious video at all! In this episode I talk about the three kings of the Henriad – Richard II, Henry IV, and Henry V, and a brief view of my theory about how Shakespeare explains the three. The final companion piece episode to “The Hollow Crown,” this episode marks the last time I’ll harp on these three dudes for a while!

Shakespeare’s Themes: End of a Tragedy

While Shakespeare tragedies often kill off many of the relevant characters, those left behind to lead the way into the future are interesting too. Here is a discussion of three characters who are raised to power by the end of their respective tragedies: Lucius (Titus Andronicus), Malcolm (Macbeth), and Fortinbras (Hamlet).

And, with a much pithier statement on the end of tragedies than I could ever muster, here is TheGeekyBlonde’s Hamlet, which ends with her Fortinbras summing up how Shakespeare ends his tragedies. http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=1mHQ8te8Rfk

Shakespeare Themes: Richard II Title Drama

In Shakespeare’s “Richard II,” on my mind due to the recent airing of “The Hollow Crown”‘s adaptation of the play, there are many moments where one character will critique another’s use of names or titles. “What did you just call me” seems to be a sentiment common to these moments, and there’s a very plot-relevant reason why, as I explore in this episode of “Shakespeare Themes”.

Shakespeare Themes: Late Plays

I half-seriously talk through the late plays: Cymbeline, The Winter’s Tale, The Tempest, Pericles, and Two Noble Kinsmen, and the themes that recur in them. What kind of world is Shakespeare going for here? This is a general overview, and more detail is forthcoming in later episodes.